Homeschool Organization – Good Enough

We’ve had a bit of a lag in our homeschool these past few weeks. Things have been crazy with the cruise, family coming to visit, sickness, and then the holidays.

But something else kept nagging at me – something I couldn’t put my finger on till this evening. I sat down to plan out what we wanted to do and was completely overwhelmed. I mean, it’s preschool. I have a Before Five in a Row curriculum. Tons of resources online. Facebook pages and blogs and pinterest boards. All I really need is craft ideas, a story, maybe a song…

And that’s what the problem is. There is so much to choose from with homeschool that I just keep looking and clicking and reading till I feel like my head is going to explode. Once I find something and am ready, then I rethink it a trillion times. “This would be fun on a colder day” “I could wait and do this in the spring when” and etc.

I’m like this with writing, working, cooking, cleaning, reading….

See – I feel like everything I do is never good enough. If I’d only go a little further, it would be even better. Many times in life this has caused me to not even attempt things knowing that I can’t do them 100% and then some.

But I really love homeschooling. I want to make it work long term, for this year to simply be the foundation for the years to come. Trial and error but that it sets that routine with us.

I have to give up that perfection side with this in order to make it work for me and for her. I can’t make homeschool into something so unachievable that I end up feeling like a failure because every lesson wasn’t Pinterest and Christmas card worthy. Which is silly anyway. I don’t need to do that, and it doesn’t benefit her.

What I decided to do was print off worksheets/crafts/animal classification cards, match it with the book in the BFIAR curriculum, and organize it all in a Ziploc bag along with any other ideas I had (materials, things I need to buy, a good season/holiday). Then when the week came to do that, it was ready to go. All I would need to do is pull out the bag and the stuff we already have (paint, crayons, etc) and then dive into homeschool together.

homeschool

Hopefully this will work better. That once I have it all set in the bag, that’s it and we can spend the week exploring the book and what goes along with it. That there is a point I can start to say, “I did my best, this is good enough, now we actually need to do it and work from here.”

Any ideas for this type of overload? How do you make homeschool creative and challenging without spending hours of time pondering about it all? Does anyone else run into this kind of thinking?

Comments

  1. I can absolutely identify with this problem. I have to do things 1 million percent or not at all it seems. Even ordering things like bottles or snappis leads to extreme price comparison until I’ve either spent an hour or given up. There are things I know that I do well and really I’d like to stick to them. I struggle with the same paralyzing perfectionism at work – which is not acceptable of course. I chalk mine up to anxiety. I find when I just get started, even if I have a bunch of false starts, things are better.

  2. Love this idea. Abby has lots of time off with me being a teacher and we enjoy saving money by not having her in preschool, but now that she’s a little sponge and thrives on learning, the teacher in me wants to do some learning stuff with her.

  3. ” Does anyone else run into this kind of thinking?”

    Story of my life!!!! I’m convinced that I would be a completely different person were
    I able to overcome this! The only trick I’ve learned is to set
    Time limits and focus on working for a set amount of time
    And being okay with that. If I focus on what I COULD or
    SHOULD do, it’s all over – I sit on the couch paralyzed with
    feelings of inadequacy.

  4. Chris Monroe says:

    Teachable moments. I read out loud everything from recipes to instructions. I use post in notes to write words names of things and have them go place on item. Working on reading and writing coloring skills on things that interest them. I took down huge atlas to discuss distances which lead to discussion on planes and how mail system works. We then mailed letters and drawings to friends other places. We made a pretend post office at home after we took a field trip to the post office. We also went to the airport and watched planes take off and took a tour of a smaller plane company (I live in northern Canada) We made paper airplanes built airplanes out of duplo got library books about planes. Within that lesson we learned lots of things and the cicerulam grew around the seed idea of distances. It took over an entire month and it held their interest and mine.

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